anhtiss
So here she is again, as sloppy and scatterbrain and sanguinary as ever. I hope and the heroine of another strange adventure.
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We are, as a species, addicted to story. Even when the body goes to sleep, the mind stays up all night, telling itself stories.
– Jonathan Gottschall, The Storytelling Animal: How Stories Make Us Human (via afigureofspeech)

(Source: revnaomiking)

5:15 pm, reblogged by anhtiss,




Then, answer me!
Then, answer me!

Then, answer me!

 
5:03 pm, reblogged by anhtiss,




There’s someone i’ve been missing
There’s someone i’ve been missing

There’s someone i’ve been missing

 
8:57 am, reblogged by anhtiss,




compoundchem:

With Valentine’s Day upcoming, a look at the supposed aphrodisiac properties of chocolate, as well as its toxicity: http://wp.me/p4aPLT-5j
compoundchem:

With Valentine’s Day upcoming, a look at the supposed aphrodisiac properties of chocolate, as well as its toxicity: http://wp.me/p4aPLT-5j

compoundchem:

With Valentine’s Day upcoming, a look at the supposed aphrodisiac properties of chocolate, as well as its toxicity: http://wp.me/p4aPLT-5j

 
8:23 am, reblogged by anhtiss,




Sudah terlalu larut ketika debu bertebaran menutup rata daerah ini di Kamis malam, tiga belas Februari. Pujon 2014, keadaannya yang sahaja tetiba terusik oleh suatu bencana. Meski jauh dari Kelud, sekalipun.
(pic: tribunnews)

Sudah terlalu larut ketika debu bertebaran menutup rata daerah ini di Kamis malam, tiga belas Februari. Pujon 2014, keadaannya yang sahaja tetiba terusik oleh suatu bencana. Meski jauh dari Kelud, sekalipun.

(pic: tribunnews)

 
10:10 pm, by anhtiss,




the-science-llama:

Ok so I thought it was necessary to make this response a post of its own… continued from here.
Edit: I added some info from commenters clearing up some things and cleaned up the format a bit.
cosmicmachinery:

wildcat2030:

Here’s What Wi-Fi Would Look Like If We Could See It
(Wildcat2030, I love you but I just- I just gotta debunk the crap out of this real quick)…Wi-fi. It’s all around us, quietly and invisibly powering our access to the world’s information. But few of us have a sense of what wi-fi actually is, let alone what it would look like if we could see it. Artist Nickolay Lamm, a blogger for MyDeals.com, decided to shed some light on the subject. He created visualizations that imagine the size, shape, and color of wi-fi signals were they visible to the human eye. “I feel that by showing what wi-fi would look like if we could see it, we’d appreciate the technology that we use everyday,” Lamm told me in an email. “A lot of us use technology without appreciating the complexity behind making it work.” To estimate what this would look like, Lamm worked with M. Browning Vogel, Ph.D., an astrobiologist and former employee at NASA Ames. Dr. Vogel described the science behind wireless technology, and Lamm used the information to create the visualizations. (via Here’s What Wi-Fi Would Look Like If We Could See It | Motherboard) (Nah, don’t even click this link. What are you thinking?)

Here’s all the reasons why this article is entirely wrong. It’s really really wrong:
The wifi range is just another set of wavelengths. In other words, it would be a continuation of what we can already see in the electromagnetic spectrum. Since color varies with wavelength, it is only reasonable to assume that wifi/radio/any electromagnetic source would look like any other light source with a different (new) color of light.
And, since at wifi wavelengths the waves are not absorbed by walls and stuff, we’d be able to see these electromagnetic sources through walls. It would be like the walls were clear to that particular color of light, just like how certain substances, like glass, do not absorb wavelengths in the visual spectrum.
The minimum threshold for the perception of light is very very low, on the order of 10^-15 watts. My own router broadcasts at 60mw. Laser pointers are eye-safe around 5mw, and lasers past 30mw are used for cool lighting effects for stages and stuff, so routers would also be powerful enough for us to see.
Sources: Engineering physics courses, electronics courses (covering optoelectronic devices like photodiodes and laser diodes) and a couple minutes on Google to tie it all together. Let me know if I’ve gotten anything very wrong.
And don’t forget that this article offers no reasoning beyond “it’s from a NASA astrobiologist” for its validity.

(^Yes^ comsmicmachinery, I don’t even know you but I love you!)This was bugging me too…I know the artist deserves some artistic leeway but these illustrations are so wrong it hurts me.
And I’m pretty sure most Wifi signals are the same wavelength, so if we could see it, it would just be the same color, whatever that may be to our brains.— But the artist had to use some color that we could already see. Like me trying to point to the 4th dimension (impossible btw) but in this case trying to show a new color. — 
Edit — Clarification from enki2:

Wifi doesn’t actually stick to a single wavelength; one of the big and interesting advances in wifi is that it combines separate signals on completely different frequency ranges and switches them up in a complex way as a mechanism for collision avoidance.

(So I it does use different wavelengths. I’ll assume that the frequency modulation would result in shifting colors from white to any other combination but this would also happen very quickly)
Maybe a little variances but I’m not an expert on this stuff (<— this is important for the rest of the article). Since we are talking about perception of color, check out this epic video by Vsauce. Ok, back to the wifi thing.
The electromagnetic spectrum for reference…(yea, we are basically blind)
Also, the waves wouldn’t just sit on the ground like some sort of fog like in the pic below. Wifi is just like any other electromagnetic signal and will radiate all around.
And I can hardly get a signal in my own damn house sometimes, so I really doubt you would be able to see wifi signals far away from you. Unless maybe you were near some cell phone tower, which would be blindingly bright (in that new color or a combination of new colors) if you stood next to it. And as the person above explained, your router would glow brightly as well, along with anything that emitted that wavelength and made it to your eye. 
So walking into a mall and shopping would be difficult (or just approaching one and trying to find the entrance since the signals go through walls) considering they are usually filled with these signals and shopping with a flood-light in front of your face is kind of hard (not speaking from experience).

The artist stresses that you would be able to see the crests of the waves themselves. No, these are not something physical just floating around in space as if it was a magical ribbon flying around. No, other light waves are not bouncing off these waves illuminating the crests and troughs allowing us to see the different parts of the waves.The only reason you can see something is because a protein in your eyeball just got blasted with a photon and eventually caused a neuron in your brain to fire. The same thing would go on here, just with a different wavelength.
That pond of water right there wouldn’t be reflecting that wifi-light either. If we were seeing only those wavelengths, the pond would be black because it absorbs them (see spectra below), otherwise it would just be the blue color we normally see. It might be darkened a bit depending on how our brains would interpret seeing both the reflecting blue-light and the absence of the wifi-light.
And according to this…

So what kind of energies are we looking at in WiFi signals? WiFi operates in the 2.4 GHz frequency range, the same as a microwave oven. The wavelength of that light is about 12.5 centimeters, which is about 125 million nanometers.

…wifi uses the same wavelength as a microwave oven, and I know cell phones use the microwave part of the spectrum as well (or about the same wavelengths, just depends on the phone I guess — but why would you evolve to only see ONE particular wavelength anyway, amiright?). So you would also be able to see cell phone signals too.


I guess the sky would just be filled with this new color, unless maybe it was humid or raining, because water absorbs those wavelengths (see the spectra above). Now you know why you get bad reception in rain.

Tangent:That’s how your microwave works by the way. Also, water absorbs blue the least, that’s why it looks blue to us — It would look crazy to bees (normal to them anyway) since they can see Ultraviolet to ~1mm wavelengths (radar).
Also your microwave, when turned on, would not glow in this new color. You ever wonder why that mesh is there on the door? That keeps the microwaves in!

Anyway, off track there for a second. Since we are just talking about the sky, the night sky would be completely different if you could see these waves.

The reason the night sky isn’t filled completely with stars is that the further away something is, the faster it is moving away from you and thus the light it emits gets red-shifted (here is an excellent post on that).

Oh look! Microwaves are basically a really-really red-shifted wavelength.

See the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation oh and MASERS in space are a thing too (like LASERS but with Microwaves).

And it seems radio waves and microwaves are able to make it through our atmosphere (if only a small amount), so you would be able to see more objects in the sky. That is, assuming you could differentiate from all of the other man-made signals flying around.
Because of this red-shifting, right now when you look up at night, you are only seeing stars in our own galaxy the Milky Way and a few other things like the Andromeda galaxy but most of it is from our galaxy. — (fun fact: we will crash into Andromeda eventually) — So being able to see this red-shifted wavelength allows you to see more objects that are further away AND those objects in a completely different light… literally.
One of the many reasons we have different telescopes that use different wavelengths is so we can see different things. — Here is a cool tool showing the different telescopes we have and the light they see in.— As soon as we starting looking at the Milky Way core in infrared for example, we can see through all of the dust in the way, allowing us to make this gorgeous 9gigapixel image of our galaxy.
Now THAT is fucking awesome! So whoever the artist was on this, take some notes and try again. Courtesy of: SCIENCE!
the-science-llama:

Ok so I thought it was necessary to make this response a post of its own… continued from here.
Edit: I added some info from commenters clearing up some things and cleaned up the format a bit.
cosmicmachinery:

wildcat2030:

Here’s What Wi-Fi Would Look Like If We Could See It
(Wildcat2030, I love you but I just- I just gotta debunk the crap out of this real quick)…Wi-fi. It’s all around us, quietly and invisibly powering our access to the world’s information. But few of us have a sense of what wi-fi actually is, let alone what it would look like if we could see it. Artist Nickolay Lamm, a blogger for MyDeals.com, decided to shed some light on the subject. He created visualizations that imagine the size, shape, and color of wi-fi signals were they visible to the human eye. “I feel that by showing what wi-fi would look like if we could see it, we’d appreciate the technology that we use everyday,” Lamm told me in an email. “A lot of us use technology without appreciating the complexity behind making it work.” To estimate what this would look like, Lamm worked with M. Browning Vogel, Ph.D., an astrobiologist and former employee at NASA Ames. Dr. Vogel described the science behind wireless technology, and Lamm used the information to create the visualizations. (via Here’s What Wi-Fi Would Look Like If We Could See It | Motherboard) (Nah, don’t even click this link. What are you thinking?)

Here’s all the reasons why this article is entirely wrong. It’s really really wrong:
The wifi range is just another set of wavelengths. In other words, it would be a continuation of what we can already see in the electromagnetic spectrum. Since color varies with wavelength, it is only reasonable to assume that wifi/radio/any electromagnetic source would look like any other light source with a different (new) color of light.
And, since at wifi wavelengths the waves are not absorbed by walls and stuff, we’d be able to see these electromagnetic sources through walls. It would be like the walls were clear to that particular color of light, just like how certain substances, like glass, do not absorb wavelengths in the visual spectrum.
The minimum threshold for the perception of light is very very low, on the order of 10^-15 watts. My own router broadcasts at 60mw. Laser pointers are eye-safe around 5mw, and lasers past 30mw are used for cool lighting effects for stages and stuff, so routers would also be powerful enough for us to see.
Sources: Engineering physics courses, electronics courses (covering optoelectronic devices like photodiodes and laser diodes) and a couple minutes on Google to tie it all together. Let me know if I’ve gotten anything very wrong.
And don’t forget that this article offers no reasoning beyond “it’s from a NASA astrobiologist” for its validity.

(^Yes^ comsmicmachinery, I don’t even know you but I love you!)This was bugging me too…I know the artist deserves some artistic leeway but these illustrations are so wrong it hurts me.
And I’m pretty sure most Wifi signals are the same wavelength, so if we could see it, it would just be the same color, whatever that may be to our brains.— But the artist had to use some color that we could already see. Like me trying to point to the 4th dimension (impossible btw) but in this case trying to show a new color. — 
Edit — Clarification from enki2:

Wifi doesn’t actually stick to a single wavelength; one of the big and interesting advances in wifi is that it combines separate signals on completely different frequency ranges and switches them up in a complex way as a mechanism for collision avoidance.

(So I it does use different wavelengths. I’ll assume that the frequency modulation would result in shifting colors from white to any other combination but this would also happen very quickly)
Maybe a little variances but I’m not an expert on this stuff (<— this is important for the rest of the article). Since we are talking about perception of color, check out this epic video by Vsauce. Ok, back to the wifi thing.
The electromagnetic spectrum for reference…(yea, we are basically blind)
Also, the waves wouldn’t just sit on the ground like some sort of fog like in the pic below. Wifi is just like any other electromagnetic signal and will radiate all around.
And I can hardly get a signal in my own damn house sometimes, so I really doubt you would be able to see wifi signals far away from you. Unless maybe you were near some cell phone tower, which would be blindingly bright (in that new color or a combination of new colors) if you stood next to it. And as the person above explained, your router would glow brightly as well, along with anything that emitted that wavelength and made it to your eye. 
So walking into a mall and shopping would be difficult (or just approaching one and trying to find the entrance since the signals go through walls) considering they are usually filled with these signals and shopping with a flood-light in front of your face is kind of hard (not speaking from experience).

The artist stresses that you would be able to see the crests of the waves themselves. No, these are not something physical just floating around in space as if it was a magical ribbon flying around. No, other light waves are not bouncing off these waves illuminating the crests and troughs allowing us to see the different parts of the waves.The only reason you can see something is because a protein in your eyeball just got blasted with a photon and eventually caused a neuron in your brain to fire. The same thing would go on here, just with a different wavelength.
That pond of water right there wouldn’t be reflecting that wifi-light either. If we were seeing only those wavelengths, the pond would be black because it absorbs them (see spectra below), otherwise it would just be the blue color we normally see. It might be darkened a bit depending on how our brains would interpret seeing both the reflecting blue-light and the absence of the wifi-light.
And according to this…

So what kind of energies are we looking at in WiFi signals? WiFi operates in the 2.4 GHz frequency range, the same as a microwave oven. The wavelength of that light is about 12.5 centimeters, which is about 125 million nanometers.

…wifi uses the same wavelength as a microwave oven, and I know cell phones use the microwave part of the spectrum as well (or about the same wavelengths, just depends on the phone I guess — but why would you evolve to only see ONE particular wavelength anyway, amiright?). So you would also be able to see cell phone signals too.


I guess the sky would just be filled with this new color, unless maybe it was humid or raining, because water absorbs those wavelengths (see the spectra above). Now you know why you get bad reception in rain.

Tangent:That’s how your microwave works by the way. Also, water absorbs blue the least, that’s why it looks blue to us — It would look crazy to bees (normal to them anyway) since they can see Ultraviolet to ~1mm wavelengths (radar).
Also your microwave, when turned on, would not glow in this new color. You ever wonder why that mesh is there on the door? That keeps the microwaves in!

Anyway, off track there for a second. Since we are just talking about the sky, the night sky would be completely different if you could see these waves.

The reason the night sky isn’t filled completely with stars is that the further away something is, the faster it is moving away from you and thus the light it emits gets red-shifted (here is an excellent post on that).

Oh look! Microwaves are basically a really-really red-shifted wavelength.

See the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation oh and MASERS in space are a thing too (like LASERS but with Microwaves).

And it seems radio waves and microwaves are able to make it through our atmosphere (if only a small amount), so you would be able to see more objects in the sky. That is, assuming you could differentiate from all of the other man-made signals flying around.
Because of this red-shifting, right now when you look up at night, you are only seeing stars in our own galaxy the Milky Way and a few other things like the Andromeda galaxy but most of it is from our galaxy. — (fun fact: we will crash into Andromeda eventually) — So being able to see this red-shifted wavelength allows you to see more objects that are further away AND those objects in a completely different light… literally.
One of the many reasons we have different telescopes that use different wavelengths is so we can see different things. — Here is a cool tool showing the different telescopes we have and the light they see in.— As soon as we starting looking at the Milky Way core in infrared for example, we can see through all of the dust in the way, allowing us to make this gorgeous 9gigapixel image of our galaxy.
Now THAT is fucking awesome! So whoever the artist was on this, take some notes and try again. Courtesy of: SCIENCE!

the-science-llama:

Ok so I thought it was necessary to make this response a post of its own… continued from here.

Edit: I added some info from commenters clearing up some things and cleaned up the format a bit.

cosmicmachinery:

wildcat2030:

Here’s What Wi-Fi Would Look Like If We Could See It

(Wildcat2030, I love you but I just- I just gotta debunk the crap out of this real quick)…

Wi-fi. It’s all around us, quietly and invisibly powering our access to the world’s information. But few of us have a sense of what wi-fi actually is, let alone what it would look like if we could see it. Artist Nickolay Lamm, a blogger for MyDeals.com, decided to shed some light on the subject. He created visualizations that imagine the size, shape, and color of wi-fi signals were they visible to the human eye. “I feel that by showing what wi-fi would look like if we could see it, we’d appreciate the technology that we use everyday,” Lamm told me in an email. “A lot of us use technology without appreciating the complexity behind making it work.” To estimate what this would look like, Lamm worked with M. Browning Vogel, Ph.D., an astrobiologist and former employee at NASA Ames. Dr. Vogel described the science behind wireless technology, and Lamm used the information to create the visualizations. (via Here’s What Wi-Fi Would Look Like If We Could See It | Motherboard) (Nah, don’t even click this link. What are you thinking?)

Here’s all the reasons why this article is entirely wrong. It’s really really wrong:

The wifi range is just another set of wavelengths. In other words, it would be a continuation of what we can already see in the electromagnetic spectrum. Since color varies with wavelength, it is only reasonable to assume that wifi/radio/any electromagnetic source would look like any other light source with a different (new) color of light.

And, since at wifi wavelengths the waves are not absorbed by walls and stuff, we’d be able to see these electromagnetic sources through walls. It would be like the walls were clear to that particular color of light, just like how certain substances, like glass, do not absorb wavelengths in the visual spectrum.

The minimum threshold for the perception of light is very very low, on the order of 10^-15 watts. My own router broadcasts at 60mw. Laser pointers are eye-safe around 5mw, and lasers past 30mw are used for cool lighting effects for stages and stuff, so routers would also be powerful enough for us to see.

Sources: Engineering physics courses, electronics courses (covering optoelectronic devices like photodiodes and laser diodes) and a couple minutes on Google to tie it all together. Let me know if I’ve gotten anything very wrong.

And don’t forget that this article offers no reasoning beyond “it’s from a NASA astrobiologist” for its validity.

(^Yes^ comsmicmachinery, I don’t even know you but I love you!)
This was bugging me too…
I know the artist deserves some artistic leeway but these illustrations are so wrong it hurts me.

And I’m pretty sure most Wifi signals are the same wavelength, so if we could see it, it would just be the same color, whatever that may be to our brains.
— But the artist had to use some color that we could already see. Like me trying to point to the 4th dimension (impossible btw) but in this case trying to show a new color. —

Edit — Clarification from enki2:

Wifi doesn’t actually stick to a single wavelength; one of the big and interesting advances in wifi is that it combines separate signals on completely different frequency ranges and switches them up in a complex way as a mechanism for collision avoidance.

(So I it does use different wavelengths. I’ll assume that the frequency modulation would result in shifting colors from white to any other combination but this would also happen very quickly)

Maybe a little variances but I’m not an expert on this stuff (<— this is important for the rest of the article). Since we are talking about perception of color, check out this epic video by Vsauce. Ok, back to the wifi thing.

The electromagnetic spectrum for reference…

(yea, we are basically blind)

Also, the waves wouldn’t just sit on the ground like some sort of fog like in the pic below. Wifi is just like any other electromagnetic signal and will radiate all around.

And I can hardly get a signal in my own damn house sometimes, so I really doubt you would be able to see wifi signals far away from you. Unless maybe you were near some cell phone tower, which would be blindingly bright (in that new color or a combination of new colors) if you stood next to it. And as the person above explained, your router would glow brightly as well, along with anything that emitted that wavelength and made it to your eye.

So walking into a mall and shopping would be difficult (or just approaching one and trying to find the entrance since the signals go through walls) considering they are usually filled with these signals and shopping with a flood-light in front of your face is kind of hard (not speaking from experience).

The artist stresses that you would be able to see the crests of the waves themselves. No, these are not something physical just floating around in space as if it was a magical ribbon flying around. No, other light waves are not bouncing off these waves illuminating the crests and troughs allowing us to see the different parts of the waves.The only reason you can see something is because a protein in your eyeball just got blasted with a photon and eventually caused a neuron in your brain to fire. The same thing would go on here, just with a different wavelength.

That pond of water right there wouldn’t be reflecting that wifi-light either. If we were seeing only those wavelengths, the pond would be black because it absorbs them (see spectra below), otherwise it would just be the blue color we normally see. It might be darkened a bit depending on how our brains would interpret seeing both the reflecting blue-light and the absence of the wifi-light.

And according to this

So what kind of energies are we looking at in WiFi signals? WiFi operates in the 2.4 GHz frequency range, the same as a microwave oven. The wavelength of that light is about 12.5 centimeters, which is about 125 million nanometers.

…wifi uses the same wavelength as a microwave oven, and I know cell phones use the microwave part of the spectrum as well (or about the same wavelengths, just depends on the phone I guess — but why would you evolve to only see ONE particular wavelength anyway, amiright?)So you would also be able to see cell phone signals too.

I guess the sky would just be filled with this new color, unless maybe it was humid or raining, because water absorbs those wavelengths (see the spectra above). Now you know why you get bad reception in rain.

Tangent:
That’s how your microwave works by the way. Also, water absorbs blue the least, that’s why it looks blue to us — It would look crazy to bees (normal to them anyway) since they can see Ultraviolet to ~1mm wavelengths (radar).

Also your microwave, when turned on, would not glow in this new color. You ever wonder why that mesh is there on the door? That keeps the microwaves in!

Anyway, off track there for a second. Since we are just talking about the sky, the night sky would be completely different if you could see these waves.

The reason the night sky isn’t filled completely with stars is that the further away something is, the faster it is moving away from you and thus the light it emits gets red-shifted (here is an excellent post on that).

Oh look! Microwaves are basically a really-really red-shifted wavelength.

See the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation oh and MASERS in space are a thing too (like LASERS but with Microwaves).

And it seems radio waves and microwaves are able to make it through our atmosphere (if only a small amount), so you would be able to see more objects in the sky. That is, assuming you could differentiate from all of the other man-made signals flying around.

Because of this red-shifting, right now when you look up at night, you are only seeing stars in our own galaxy the Milky Way and a few other things like the Andromeda galaxy but most of it is from our galaxy. — (fun fact: we will crash into Andromeda eventually) — So being able to see this red-shifted wavelength allows you to see more objects that are further away AND those objects in a completely different light… literally.

One of the many reasons we have different telescopes that use different wavelengths is so we can see different things. — Here is a cool tool showing the different telescopes we have and the light they see in.— As soon as we starting looking at the Milky Way core in infrared for example, we can see through all of the dust in the way, allowing us to make this gorgeous 9gigapixel image of our galaxy.

Now THAT is fucking awesome! So whoever the artist was on this, take some notes and try again. Courtesy of: SCIENCE!


 
12:10 pm, reblogged by anhtiss,




science-junkie:

molecularlifesciences:

Top 5 misconceptions about evolution: A guide to demystify the foundation of modern biology.
Version 2.0
Donate here to support science education:  National Center for Science Education http://ncse.com
Thank you followers for all your support!Love, molecularlifesciences.tumblr.com

You can find version 1.0 here.

science-junkie:

molecularlifesciences:

Top 5 misconceptions about evolution: A guide to demystify the foundation of modern biology.

Version 2.0

Donate here to support science education:  
National Center for Science Education http://ncse.com

Thank you followers for all your support!
Love, 
molecularlifesciences.tumblr.com

You can find version 1.0 here.

2:28 pm, reblogged by anhtiss,




Sejak enam belas bulan lalu menjabat sebagai mahasiswa, hari ini, barulah hari ini, mendapat pengakuan dosen akan rapihnya presentasi meski hanya di hadapan dua puluh tiga kepala. Sendiri, presentasi sendiri.

2:20 pm, by anhtiss,





If you’re a teen you must follow this blog.
 
1:39 pm, reblogged by anhtiss,




image

The great pioneer for bright future.

Yes, we are pioneer. Perkenalkan, kami mahasiswa pelopor program studi Pendidikan IPA Universitas Negeri Malang. Pun akan acara ini, acara pertama yang kami adakan secara resmi. Diselenggarakan atas dasar pelatihan dan pembentukan karakter pemimpin bagi mahasiswa, bagi para “agent of change”. Yang tak kalah penting tentunya, yaitu untuk mempererat kekeluargaan antar mahasiswa program studi Pendidikan IPA angkatan pertama (2012) sebagai panitia penyelenggara dengan mahasiswa prodi Pendidikan IPA angkatan kedua (2013) sebagai peserta. Mengapa? Karena dengan diadakannya acara tersebut, diharapkan kami dapat menguatkan dan membangun program studi ini menjadi suatu wadah yang solid, sinergis, serta harmonis.

Dalam perjalanannya (untuk menyelenggarakan acara ini), segenap crew (34 mahasiswa angkatan 2012) berjuang menembus batas [pastinya panitia tau dong apa yang dimaksud? Hehe :p]. Tak mudah memang untuk merealisasikannya, meski acara kami hanya dalam lingkup kecil. Mengingat program studi Pendidikan IPA belum mempunyai wadah kemahasiswaan secara legal. Pada akhirnya, segala hambatan dan rintangan yang ada dapat diselesaikan berkat kerjasama yang apik antar panitia penyelenggara. Thankyou guys, we’re awesome! :)

So let’s start the story. Karena memang acara ini bernamakan Latihan Kepemimpinan Prodi Pendidikan IPA, tentunya materi inti yang disajikan bertemakan kepemimpinan pula. Stadium general dibawakan oleh Bapak Agung Witjoro selaku Wakil Kepala Program Studi Pendidikan IPA. Pada akhir sesion ini, Pak Agung sukses membuat haru peserta dan panitia dengan video singkat bertajuk cinta kasih untuk ibu. [Hayooo, siapa aja nih yang gak kuat nahan tangis?]. Dilanjutkan dengan materi dari Ketua Badan Eksekutif Mahasiswa (BEM FMIPA), Kak A’an Karuniawan Prasetia yang membacakan puisi. Dilanjutkan dengan materi lain oleh Kak Assayid dan Kak Sakti perihal Tipe Kepemimpinan. Hingga menginjak pada materi terakhir mengenai Dinamika Kelompok, para peserta tetap antusias mengikuti jalannya acara. Pada sesi ini, peserta bergabung kedalam tiga kelompok besar yang masing-masing bertindak sebagai Pemerintah Kota, Produsen Mobil, serta Masyarakat. Ketiganya saling melontar dan meempertahankan argumen kelompok hingga tak jarang menimbulkan kericuhan. Akan tetapi, sesi inilah yang menjadikan serangkaian acara pada hari pertama berlangsung menarik. Tak membosankan.

image

Hari kedua, Kak Vitra berbagi materi teknik komunikasi. Para peserta terlihat konsentrasi dan antusias dengan apa yang disampaikan penyaji, mengingat pentingnya materi ini untuk diterapkan dalam kehidupan sehari-hari. Setelahnya, Kak Toriq membimbing kami dengan pengetahuan teknik persidangan yang biasa digunakan untuk menyetujui dan mengesahkan poin-poin yang ada pada draft AD/ART dan tata tertib dalam suatu organisasi. Nah! Ini materi paling seru karena lebih ditekankan pada praktiknya. Simulasi sidang dimulai dengan memilih tiga orang presidium dari para peserta. Ghufron sebagai Presidium I, Citra sebagai Presidium II, dan Jazuli sebagai Presidium III. Sidang berlangsung secara intens. Secara bertubi-tubi, peserta sidang yang terdiri dari mahasiswa 2013 dan panitia penyelenggara melontarkan interupsi, baik mengoreksi, memberi informasi, menjustifikasi, bahkan terjadi perdebatan antara peserta sidang. Simulasi juga berlangsung secara kocak karena kecanggungan presidium yang masih bingung meng-handle sidang dan mengondisikan peserta, hingga tak jarang malah membuat kami tertawa.

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Here we go! Acara yang ditunggu-tunggu. Outbond. Let’s have fun together guys :D. Secara berkelompok, peserta berkompetisi menyelesaikan lima race yang disiapkan di penjuru Fakultas MIPA UM. Jeritan, tawa, teriakan semangat terucap oleh peserta sebagai bagian dari keseruan yang tercipta. Unfortunately, ketika semua group outbond masih dapat menyelesaikan dua race yang ada, matahari sedang tak bersahabat dengan kami. Hujan menyapa. Dengan segera, plan-b dilaksanakan. Semua peserta dan panitia berkumpul kembali di ruangan paling bersejarah [yaaaa lebih tepatnya satu-satunya ruangan yang diperuntukkan bagi Pendidikan IPA], GKB 102 :)

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What a pity, keseruan outbond harus terhenti. Tapi siapa sangka? Disinilah kami menjadi makin gila. Sembari menunggu hujan tak turun lagi, mahasiswa 2013 berkali-kali menyuarakan yel-yel yang selama ini mereka junjung tinggi sebagai iconnya. Tak mau kalah, mahasiswa 2012 menyorakkan kembali jargon-jargon semasa masih berstatus sebagai mahasiswa baru setahun yang lalu. Hingga yang ada hanyalah harmonisasi apik akan yel-yel yang disuarakan, yang mengalahkan riuh rendah suara hujan. Entah bagaimana, kami sama terkejutnya ketika sebuah yel yang diserukan oleh angkatan 2012 disambut dengan harmonis oleh angkatan 2013.

“dung tak dung ces

dung dung dung tak dung dung dung ces

dung dung tak dung dung ces

pring keretek gunung kapur jebol

diulang madep mantep omega jempol”

We yell along and laugh together :D

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Tak lengkap rasanya jika tak mengerjai koordinator acara dari panitia penyelenggara, one of the successor. Yes, we are all the successor. But still, the coordinator…. . Karena c.o acara kita punya hobi nyanyi, alhasil dipaksalah ia untuk nyanyi satu lagu favoritnya di depan semua peserta dan panitia lain. Layang Sworo, dengan lantang dinyanyikan oleh Yayang Prananda dan didukung oleh goyangan beberapa panitia disekitarnya. I told you before, disini kami menjadi makin gila. Semakin mengejutkan ketika lagu menginjak bagian refrain, anak-anak 2013 dengan semangatnya berdiri, nyanyi, lalu joget secara massal. Kegilaan tak hanya sampai di Layang Sworo. Alun-alun Nganjuk, Oplosan, dan Mawar Hitam semua digoyang habis oleh kami. What a weird moment. But just think that we’re awesome guys :D

Perlahan awan kelabu berarak pergi, hujan menitipkan salam perpisahannya lewat tetesan air yang singgah pada dedaunan. Pun akan kami, waktunya untuk mengakhiri acara ini. Sayup-sayup terdengar lantunan lagu Sahabat Kecil dari Ipang. Tak ada yang lebih cocok memang, lirik lagu ini sangat tepat menggambarkan sekaligus menjadi harapan kami agar momen ini tak cepat berganti.

Baru saja berakhir hujan di sore ini

Tak pernah terlewatkan dan tetap mengaguminya

Kesempatan seperti ini tak akan bisa dibeli

Bersamamu kuhabiskan waktu senang bisa mengenal dirimu

Rasanya semua begitu sempurna

Sayang untuk mengakhirinya

Janganlah berganti~

Tetaplah seperti ini~

Malang.

Sabtu dan Minggu, 9-10 November 2013.

4:11 pm, by anhtiss,